Moving Beyond the NSF

Oregon was previously 1 of only 7 jurisdictions in North America that required treatment systems be certified by NSF. NSF’s certification protocol does not physically monitor effluent characteristics in order to verify system performance in the field. Thanks to Recode this is no lon
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Understanding Oregon’s Regulations for Septic, Composting Toilet & Graywater Systems

What's regulated by plumbing? What's regulated by DEQ? What permit do you need? Recode created this one document to help you understand how toilets, graywater, and rainwater are are regulated in Oregon.
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Comparing Nitrogen Reduction Standards: Oregon & Elsewhere

Recent concerns over nitrates (think urine) in groundwater and surface waters have driven tighter regulations on nitrogen discharge. This document compares the different standards from around the world using the same unit of measurement so you can compare apples to apples. Performance
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Where Do Septic Tank Plumes Go?

Contrary to common perception septic tank system effluent plumes do NOT readily disperse into the groundwater. Rather effluent plumes (i.e. urine and graywater) move with the direction of groundwater as discrete plumes for miles undiluted. The closer houses are the higher chance of a
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Ecological Infrastructure Tour

Recode toured the state in 2012 to educate communities & regulators in Oregon about the benefits of creating "waste" treatment rules for Oregon that judge alternatives to septic and sewer systems on their performance and let alternatives compete on cost. Our goal was to lay the grou
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Developing Codes: Reach Code for Site-built Composting Toilets in Oregon

Recode legalized site built composting toilets and non-NSF 41 certified manufactured composting toilets in 2011 through Reach Code 1307.4 amending OAR 918-465-0040 & 918-465-0070. Our performance based code protects human health while giving home owners an affordable option for insta
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