Many people are seated at round tables as Paula Kehoe addresses the room.

Recode sponsored Paul Kehoe of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission to address the 2017 Water Summit participants regarding the groundbreaking water reuse work she and other partners are doing in California and nationally. A few months after the conference, Seattle adopted a rainwater harvesting regulation based on San Francisco’s water reuse code.

The International Living Future Institute and Recode teamed up to host the 2017 Water Summit one day before the start of the Living Future 2017 unConference. Over 80 attendees provided feedback on next generation water barriers and potential solutions pathways the informed our white paper below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Robb recently did a post on the interplay between building regulations and sustainable innovation and used Molly’s diagram on water and nutrient reuse codes here in Oregon to demonstrate his point. Check out the full post at Resilient Communites.

 

We were inspired by Central City Concern’s visualization of the rules guiding (and limiting) reuse of water and nutrients in Oregon, to make our own now that rules have changed.  Ever wondered what permit you need for a site built composting toilet? Or how graywater and blackwater are regulated? Or just really like graphical representations of complex systems?  Feel free to send feedback to molly@recodeoregon.org.  It’s open source so feel free to modify it or use it for your own purposes.

Oregon Regulations for Water & Nutrient Reuse

We (Melora, Mathew and Molly)  just got back from our first Recode Ecosan Tour.  We visited DEQ offices in Bend, Medford and Coos Bay.  We held public presentations in Bend, Coquille and Ashland. Thanks so much to our hosts for welcoming us in to their communities.

 

Yesterday Recode participants and 15 DEQ staff from the DEQ’s NW Regional office sat down and discussedwe manage our water and excrement.  Recode researchers Mathew Lippincott and Molly Danielsson have been asking experts in conventional and alternative treatment in the US and Europe what they see as the future for managing water and excrement on sites.  They shared five case studies that showcase the myriad solutions to these dynamic issues.

Thanks to everyone at the DEQ office for bringing your voice to this nuanced issue.

Unfortunately, many places, including Oregon, are moving towards copyrighted building codes. This means that accessing the laws governing construction codes is a pain. The state allows you to view them online, but only through either a proprietary electronic reader or through locked PDF files.  Printing and copying and pasting are turned off.

Luckily, the good people at public.resource.org are taking a stand.  They believe copyrighted codes are inimical to democracy and are acquiring and releasing codes for free, without restrictions, and preparing for any legal challenges to their position.  They have made copyrighted Oregon codes available here at archive.org.

Recode volunteers Mathew Lippincott and Molly Danielsson will be at Oregon Water Education Foundation’s Water Environment School at Clackamas Community College this week.

Thanks to Abe Ingle of Fine Design Group for helping us get our new website up and running.  We’re currently researching how Sweden and Finland have dramatically revolutionized onsite treatment systems to make them more cost effective, meet higher nutrient standards for the output and become a leader in the sustainable water and sanitation sector.  Check out Sweden’s web portal for homeowners to find out how to make decisions about their onsite treatment systems: The Onsite Guide.  We’ve been able to read it thanks to Google Chrome’s translation feature. Everything that says “sewer” or “drain” is meant to say septic tank or system. What’s nice about this is it outlines all the current options for onsite systems, who can install them and how well they treat them. It’s interesting to see how many more choices they have for ecological sanitation than we have here in the States.